Our Process

It all starts here…Early in the spring when the nights are below zero (-5 ideally), and the days are above zero (+5 ideally) and sunny, this is when the sap will flow heavily. Sap is delivered through the plastic, food grade tubing to the sugar house, by use of a vacuum pump.

 In with the new, food grade pipeline & mainline.
In with the new, food grade pipeline & mainline.

Our property is mainly flat ground, so we use a sap ladder, powered by vacuum to lift sap vertically in depressional areas to upper sections of mainline….

Step 2
Step 2

This is our vacuum pump…This is what supply’s vacuum to the entire tubing system in our sugar bush, drawing the sap to our sugar house.

Step 3
Step 3

Since we have only one source of vacuum for the entire bush, with out the use of vacuum gauges, leaks would be difficult to find…You will find vacuum gauges at the end of each section of lateral line which tee’s to the mainline…When we find that vacuum pressure is low on a certain section, leaks are easier to find vs. checking each & every line in the bush.

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Once the sap has been brought to the sugar house, it then goes for a ride in our reverse osmosis (RO) machine…The RO removes aprx. 50% of the water from the sap, leaving us with a sap concentrate. When 50% of the water is removed from our sap, this reduces the boiling time by 50%, therefore saving the amount of wood needed to boil the sap…Not to mention cuts the boil time in half!

Reverse_Osmosis

From the RO machine the sap is pumped to our stainless steel holding tanks, we need to have both tanks full for each boil, as we need cold sap to cool off our evaporator…The evaporator is never completly emptied, or we would have a burnt mess on our hands!

Step 6
Step 6

From the holding tanks we pull cold sap into the evaporator, we boil the sap to reach our desired temperature & consistency…Our evaporator is a recent investment, this evaporator is made of food-grade stainless steel, with stainless welds. Many of the older evaporators are made of stainless steel, but will contain lead in their welds.

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When we reach our desired temperature (daily temps can fluctuate, depending on that day’s barometric pressure), we release some of the maple syrup from the evaporator through the first filter then it’s pumped to the finishing pan, this is where we ensure each batch is at the perfect density…A perfect maple syrup has a brix density of 66.7%.

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On the maple syrup’s travels to the canning room, it first passes through a filter press, this will remove any impurities and improve the clarity of the syrup…We bottle each bottle of syrup between 160-180 degrees farenheight, this heat will create a seal, ensuring fresh, hot packed maple syrup reaches your table…REMEMBER, always refrigerate or freeze your maple syrup.

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Thanks for visiting out our website & we look forward to seeing you this spring!